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Events 2014
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exerpt from the WAS website...
http://ucanr.edu/sites/was2/Conference_Information/

was1"The 36th Annual Conference of the Western Apicultural Society will take place mainly  in the University Center of the University of Montana, Missoula.

The WAS Conference will be nested in a number of other events happening at the same time, or within days, including the 2nd International Workshop on Hive and Bee Monitoring, a "Color Run" (about 2,000 runners?), and the Missoula Honey Harvest Festival.  The WAS Conference will have a wide variety of speakers, on topics such as latest bee research from the U.S. and Canada; bee diseases; pesticides.  Broadening out, there will be presentations on climate change; native and urban plants for honey bees and native pollinators; and encouraging the use of locally grown crops and practicing sustainability in crop production.

The President's Message contains much more information on various aspects of the program, which is not yet finalized.  So return to the "Conference" link from time to time for updates.

This would be a good time to consider lodging for the Conference.  The Doubletree by Hilton Hotel might be the best bet.  It is a full-service hotel (Finn and Porter Restaurant, free shuttle from and to the Missoula airport, etc.) within walking distance of the campus.  The hotel address is 100 Madison Street, Missoula, MT.  Phone: (406) 728-3100.  The other, newer hotels, are on the opposite side of town.  They are too far away to walk to the campus and parking on campus is extremely limited."

Conference Details:
http://ucanr.edu/sites/was2/Conference_Information/Conference_Details/

Pre-Registration:
http://ucanr.edu/sites/was2/Conference_Information/Conference_Pre-registration_Form/

Late Registation:
http://ucanr.edu/sites/was2/Conference_Information/Late_Registration_or_On-site/

Lodging:
http://ucanr.edu/sites/was2/Conference_Information/Hawaii_Hotel_Reservation_Form/

T-Shirt Order Form:
http://ucanr.edu/sites/was2/Conference_Information/2011_Conference_T-Shirt/
Last Updated on Monday, 21 July 2014 09:17
 
Events 2014
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beekeepersJune 22nd UPDATE! For everyone that RSVP'd to the field day - the field day is still on rain or shine! (hopefully shine). There is shelter from the rain if need be. Don't forget your juice/lemonade for the contest! Map to the orchard is here https://goo.gl/maps/JRhr2

If you plan to attend, would you please RSVP by June 14 either by replying to
ads@reginabeeclub.ca or by calling Keara at 306-539-2729.

Directions are as follows:
>From Regina, head north towards Lumsden on Highway 11. At Exit A, turn left and head west on secondary highway, # 734. Proceed west, about 8 km and as the highway veers north, DO NOT VEER NORTH but instead continue west on to gravel. Head down hill and on your right you will see the "Over the Hill Orchard" sign.

We look forward to seeing you there!

When - Sunday, June 22  
Registration at 1:00 PM, Tour begins at 2:00(Tour takes 1 - 1.5 hours)

Where - Over the Hill Orchards - 20 minutes north west of Regina, off of
Highway 11, map and directions will follow.

What - See the orchard in bloom, learn about their eco-friendly growing
processes, see how they turn their fruits into delectable products and learn
about their fruit breeding program.   Enjoy a fresh slice of pie and a coffee
after the tour and the opportunity to visit with other bee keepers.

$12.00 - bee club members
$15.00 - non members

This is a great place to spend the afternoon and visit with Bee Club
members.  We hope to see you there.
Last Updated on Sunday, 22 June 2014 10:09
 
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dohb_May_29_LyleStewart
Thanks to the work of Clinton Shane Ekdahl, Honourable Lyle Stewart, Saskatchewan's Agriculture Minister has declared:

May 29th the Day of the Honey Bee!

More on this here!
Last Updated on Sunday, 01 June 2014 11:12
 
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TonyBistretzanAnton "Tony" Bistretzan
It is with heavy hearts and great sorrow that we announce the sudden passing of a husband, father, grandfather and great- grandfather, Anton (Tony) Bistretzan on Monday, May 12, 2014 while working at the family farm. Tony was born June 22, 1937 in the district of Crystal Hill, SK and was the 11th of 15 children born to Gregory and Anica Bistretzan. Tony will be lovingly remembered by his wife Rita, daughters Donna (Paul), Karen and Diana (Michael) along with grandchildren Anthony (Chelsea), Amanda, Keara (Justin), Kalena (Kenton), Kaila (Drew), Rhett, Sahara and 6 great-grandchildren. Tony devoted 33 years to the Regina Fire Department, was a hard working farmer with a passion for clowning. Funeral Service will be held at 10:30 a.m. on Friday, May 16, 2014 at Avonhurst Pentecostal Assembly, 3200 Avonhurst Drive, Regina, SK. In lieu of flowers, those wishing to make a donation in Tony's memory may do so to the Regina Firefighters Burn Unit. Funeral arrangements entrusted to Paragon Funeral Services and Avonhurst Pentecostal Assembly. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/leaderpost/obituary.aspx?n=anton-bistretzan&pid=171031767&#sthash.GFFas6Yu.dpuf
Last Updated on Thursday, 15 May 2014 22:13
 
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excerpt from North Central Regional Center for Rural Development

bannerMarla Spivak, University of Minnesota
Tuesday April 22, 2014
12 pm (CT) / 1 pm (ET)

To register for this FREE upcoming webinar go to:
http://ncrcrd.msu.edu/ncrcrd/innovations_in_agriculture_and_rural_development
This FREE webinar series is sponsored by: North Central Regional Center for Rural Development

Given the chronic health problems facing honey bees and the increasing demand for pollination services from almond, blueberry, cranberry, apple, vine crops and many other growers, commercial beekeepers and breeders have requested assistance in maintaining healthy colonies. To this end, we began a novel “Bee Tech Transfer Team” program through the Bee Informed Partnership, a 5-year grant funded by USDA-NIFA. These teams consist of independent beekeepers that provide on-the-ground services to commercial beekeepers to assess and record colony health information; survey beekeepers about management; test for bee diseases and parasites; and assist in breeding bees that are more resistant to diseases and parasites. There is demand for this program nationwide and we are exploring ways to ensure that the Tech Team services are economically sustainable after the funding ends in 2016. As bees are directly or indirectly responsible for 35% of our diet through their pollination services, it is critical to increase effort to keep bees healthy and to provide hands-on assistance to the beleaguered beekeeping industry throughout the U.S.

SPIVAK-2Marla Spivak is a MacArthur Fellow and McKnight Distinguished Professor in Entomology at the University of Minnesota. She has bred a line of honey bees, the Minnesota Hygienic line, to defend themselves against diseases and parasitic mites. Current studies include the benefits of propolis to honey bees, and the effects of agricultural landscapes and pesticides on honey bee and native bee health.
Last Updated on Monday, 21 April 2014 10:39
 
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membernewsAttention Members!
We've posted some information and pictures from the AGM in the back end of the site (members only). Please login to check it out.

 
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exerpt from http://www.uoguelph.ca/canpolin/New/new.html
canpolin


Each webinar will focus on a crop of joint interest to Canadian and Latin American agriculture: greenhouse crops, pome fruits and oilseeds. The webinars will feature expert presentations that address our general state of knowledge and identify areas for future research, and provide an on-line discussion forum. Participation in each one-hour webinar is free of charge but pre-registration is encouraged.

For more information about webinar presenters or how to join, click on the webinar of interest:

Greenhouse Pollination - Friday, March 21 @ 11 am EDT    REGISTER NOW
Pome Fruit Pollination - Tuesday, March 25 @ 12 pm EDT    REGISTER NOW
Oilseed Crop Pollination - Thursday, March 27 @ 2:30 EDT    REGISTER NOW

WATCH completed webinars online on CANPOLIN's Youtube channel.

Last Updated on Monday, 24 March 2014 12:18
 
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excerpt from http://pfspbees.org/bee-friendly-farming/certification

Bee Friendly Farmer Certification ApplicationbfflogoSM

READ MORE


Last Updated on Monday, 24 March 2014 11:42
 
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Excerpt from Health Canada Consumer Product Safety Mar 24/2014

DOWNLOAD this in PDF format from Health Canada
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/cps-spc/alt_formats/pdf/pubs/pest/_fact-fiche/pollinator-protection-pollinisateurs/treated_seed-semences_traitees-eng.pdf

New 2014 requirement

When using a seed flow lubricant for planting corn or soybean seed treated with neonicotinoid insecticides clothianidin, thiamethoxam or imidacloprid, only the Fluency Agent by Bayer CropScience is permitted to minimize the potential for abrasion that produces insecticidal seed dust. Talc and graphite are not permitted to be used as a seed flow lubricant for corn or soybean seed treated with these insecticides. Carefully follow the use directions provided with the Fluency Agent by Bayer CropScience.

Best Management Practices

Insect pollinators are vital to agricultural production and the environment. Many farmers, including those who grow corn and soybeans, use insecticide treated seed to protect their crop from insect pests. Some insecticides, such as neonicotinoids, are toxic to pollinators. Planting of treated seed can spread dust that contains insecticide into the air, placing pollinators at significant risk of exposure to toxic insecticides. Factors that impact the risk of exposure include the use of treated seed, type of planting equipment, planting conditions, flowering resources and bee yard locations.

The following Best Management Practices (BMPs) are provided to reduce the risk to bees and other insect pollinators from exposure to dust from treated seed. The BMPs provide a toolbox of options that should be used in combination wherever possible.